Mrs Beeton’s Adventure – Roly-Poly Jam Pudding

Welcome back to my next instalment of Mrs Beeton’s adventures, and here in NZ right now I thought everyone could do with a comfort food bake. ❤. Lets be swept away, come join me on my next adventure into the vintage baking world…..

Many of you may have made or eaten versions of this bake during your childhood and I think it’s lovely to bring back those memories by baking something with love. Today’s journey takes us into the world of pastry and puddings where we are going to be making a Roly-Poly Jam Pudding. 😁

Now this one is a three parter as I could not leave out the thing which makes this pudding extra nostalgic, but first things first I gathered the ingredients together for the pastry and jam pudding on my benchtop and set to work.

There are only two ingredients in Jam Roly poly but the first is suet crust which I needed to make from scratch beforehand. Suet crust includes flour, beef suet and water, now I couldn’t get hold of beef suet, so after consulting Mr google I decided to use shortening instead. If using beef suet the instructions are to ‘free the suet from the skin and shred, then chopping up extremely fine, rub into your flour‘. As I was using fridge cold shortening I used my old trick and grated it into the flour to give a fine consistency when rubbing in. For every pound of flour you will need 5/6 ounces of suet (or shortening) and then mix in 1/2 pint of water.

After mixing it by hand or in my case, my trusty Kenwood mixer it should look something like this…

Mrs Beeton explains that if you would like to go for a richer pasty you can use 1/2 to 3/4 pound of suet to every pound of flour. And if you are feeling extra energetic on the day, why not pound the suet in a mortar with a little butter and lay it on the pastry in small pieces as you would do for a puff pastry.

My workout today was the rolling of the pastry on my baking board, to around 1/2 inch thick. I think that’s plenty for one day, don’tcha think. 😁 Then the fun part was lathering the pastry with my homemade rhubarb and strawberry jam, the recipe calls for 3/4 pound but I say why not go wild!

Then you know what to do….roll it all up into a big sausage. I laid it on some floured calico I had, rolled that up around it and tied the ends up like a Christmas cracker. 😁

Mrs Beeton says to put the pudding into boiling water and boil for 2 hours. As I didn’t have any pot big enough for that feat I made a makeshift water bath and put my trusty oven to the test, at 180 degrees Celsius. Because the water evaporates you will need to keep an eye on it and top up when necessary.

Here are my Macgyver skills in action. 😂

While that was cooking happily away I got to thinking….What jam Roly poly is complete without the addition of some glorious custard. Why not go the whole hog people, it wouldn’t be the same without it. ❤️

Waddya know, there was a recipe for Boiled custard just a few pages along. This custard needed a pint of milk, 3 eggs, 3 oz sugar and flavouring of whatever your hearts desire. Mrs Beeton suggests bay leaves, lemons rind or vanilla extract, and a cheeky tablespoon of brandy to finish it off.

The milk gets popped into the saucepan with the sugar and flavouring and ‘steeped by the side of the fire until well flavoured’. I chose a low setting on my stovetop for this. The flavourings get taken out with straining the milk and then you will need to cook down the milk a little before stirring in the whisked eggs (you don’t want scrambled eggs in your custard, trust me).

There is a very lengthy description of what to do if you would like a richer custard, of which some are using 2 duck eggs, cream instead of milk, and doubling the eggs using only the yolks. The pot goes back on the heat and stir it ‘only one direction’ until it thickens. A very important point in italics is on no account allow it to reach boiling point, in other words have patience (if you can). The brandy is added after it is taken off the stovetop if you so desire and nutmeg grated on top. 😁

Violà! Delicious custard! 🤤

All that was left to do was remove the pudding from my oven and wait patiently for it to cool a little to avoid burning my fingers.

Cutting it into slices and putting 2 in my bowl (no judgment please 😁), I poured a healthy amount of custard and sat down to enjoy.

I hope you enjoyed this bake as much as I did, don’t forget to let me know if you’ve tried it by commenting below. Remember if you would like a follow-along video that will be up on my YouTube channel soon.

Til next time lovely readers ❤️ Bon Apetit!

2021-11-10T09:04:25+13:0027 August 2021|Bakes, Cakes, History, Makes, Mrs Beeton's Cookbook|0 Comments

A different kind of vintage bake 💕

Hi all you lovely people, and welcome to my baking blog for those of you who are new 🙂

Having recently celebrated my *cough* (we won’t say exactly what number) birthday and getting the most exciting present of a stack of rather lovely vintage cookbooks, I decided to change tack for this blog post and segue into the 60’s.

The beautiful area of Devonport here in good old NZ is home to an extensively stocked 2ndhand/vintage bookshop called, funnily enough, Book-Mark. ❤️ They always come up trumps when we visit looking for goodies and this time was no exception! Among the stack my parents bought me was a cookbook which they recognised as one my Scottish grandmother had cooked from (hopefully she will get to read this). The Kenwood recipe book is the title and this one hails from 1960. I thought this was pretty darn cool and as I have a Kenwood mixer just like my Gran did, I thought it would be perfect to give the recipes a try.

I wanted something to impress the fam and this cookbook didn’t disappoint…with the rather grand title of (putting on a perfect French accent, not 😂) “Genoise” Gateau à la Vanille, I felt this bake was perfect! There is even a byline telling the reader that this recipe was published by kind permission of Mr Trompeto, of the Grosvenor Hotel in London. How posh is that!

Scanning through I saw that even though the recipe was two-thirds of the page instruction wise, it doesn’t contain too many ingredients. You will need eggs, castor sugar, flour, butter, milk and water. The recipe is divided into two sections, the cake and the icing, and it pays to read through before starting. There is a variation note which suggests you could make this up as one Gateau or multiple petite fours, I thought why not grease and flour a few more pans and go for the smaller cakes. If you’re going to put in the work why not go the whole hog. 😁

For both parts of this recipe, you are required to warm the bowl, so I went for the old fashioned way and filled it with warm water and let it sit for a bit before drying clean again to start.

The eggs and first measure of castor sugar go into the bowl and are vigorously beaten for a good 8-10 minutes, which is where a standing mixer is fantastic if you would like to keep the feeling in your arms. 😁 It ends up looking like a fluffy vanilla cloud in the bowl..very satisfying.

The next step is a very careful folding in of the flour and the first measure of butter (melted, but not hot). Pour this mixture into your tin or tins and into the oven it goes at a moderate 375F (190C). For……minutes, it doesn’t actually say here but my little cakes took 20 minutes cosily all in together.
And voila your cake part is done. 👏

Onwards and upwards to the icing and your warmed bowl. Now, this states that you need to attach the ‘Juice extractor & Oil dropper’ to your mixer, which is a pretty cool looking attachment. Sadly I did not own this myself so I Macgyvered it and stood slowly squeezing a dropper bottle into my mixing bowl. Tedious but not very taxing on the body. 😁 The Kenwood mixer, with attachment, shown below.

The second amount of softened butter gets popped into the mixer with the second lot of castor sugar and while mixing you need to drip in the combined water and milk into the bowl slowly, taking about 5 minutes in total. Don’t forget to flavour with your vanilla essence and you should get a mixture that looks pretty similar to a mock cream.

Then the fun part…we get to ice and decorate! Woop!

Cutting the cakes in half I sandwiched the two layers together with my icing and then spread the rest thinly around each cake (Top and sides). I like to pipe so added a few fancy do-dad’s to the top of each cake and some cute sprinkles. The recipe suggests toasted almonds, and chocolate powder added to the centre icing to pipe, but it’s really up to you to go where the creative juices take you. ❤️

Here is one of my finished creations….

I hope you have fun with this bake and if you are looking for a detailed ingredient list, please check out my YouTube video at Sweet Sensations NZ. I really look forward to hearing from you and seeing you back here soon. ❤️

YouTube video link: https://youtu.be/tdLSkLtBZWY

 

2021-11-10T08:55:03+13:0012 August 2021|Advice|0 Comments

Tips for Great Present Giving

Tips for Great Present Giving

We are gearing up to one of the biggest celebrations of the year and some of you may be stuck on what to get a certain person…fear not, I am here to give you a few handy tips on great present giving!

1. Be a great listener…

This is the best tip when you need to find out what your friends and family really love to do, or are passionate about at the moment. Is there a hobby that they love to spend time on or one that they would really like to take up but don’t have all the gear? A book about that topic or a starter pack to get them going (as long as it’s not going to cost an arm and a leg). You can find many small bits and pieces that connect to any kind of hobby, for example…Fishing…how about a small tackle box and some sinkers and flies? Or do they enjoy sports or would like to take up a new one? A good present would be some accessories or a ‘how to’ book. An avid baker might like a vintage cookbook or some out of print ones that can no longer be found in your retail shops.

There are clues in your conversations with them, and spending quality time with them will make you feel happy and geared up about the season ahead, so it is a win win!

2. Look for clues

How do they live their day to day life? Is it super busy? Are they big fans of a certain sport or past-time?

Busy people may enjoy a present for a relaxing activity, something they rarely get to do or something that they used to do but never have the time for anymore. These presents have great health benefits and can boost the receiver’s spirits, how can you get any better?

Do they mention things that they used to have or miss from their childhood? This one can bring back fond memories and could be a cherished present for years to come. Personally, this would be my favourite type of present!

Sports fans are pretty easy to buy for as you can find so many things these days which are printed with favourite teams logos, from socks to jerseys, drink bottles to bedspreads. The choice is endless. A big sports fan won’t be able to stop from telling you about their favourite team and how they did at the weekend. http://swiftmovement.co.nz/custom-printing have a great range of personalised logos which can be tailored to your receiver.

3. You don’t need to go expensive.

As a big fan of op shops throughout our area, I can tell you that I have often found things that have long since stopped being manufactured in the latest stores and are often in new or as new condition!

There are so many 2nd hand shops throughout the country and they often have some gems, all you need to do is go in with an eagle eye and an open mind and you can find your treasure. I follow a Facebook page which is dedicated to op-shopping and they have the greatest finds on there! A great place for ideas and they often share where you can find certain vintage items, so you can go straight to the source.

A great place to find vintage books and lots of new looking books for all those hobbies you have found out about. Some receivers treasure an old book much more than a brand new one.

4. Buy Handmade

This is an avenue which means you support your local makers and small businesses and get a product which has time, love and effort put into making it the best it can be. If you are buying for someone special and contact the makers, they can often tailor the handmade item to the receivers favourite colour, flavour, hobby and even personalisation can make it super special. We even welcome these kinds of requests!

You are getting a one of a kind product which not many if any, people will be able to match with a mass produced item. As a maker, I know they put a lot of love and time into making a product just right and there can be no better way to show someone you love and care about them. You can check out some of my makes on Instagram @sewsweetnz and @sweetsensationsnz, or on my website here or Facebook at:

https://www.facebook.com/sweetsensationsnz.

If you are crafty put your skills to the test and get making! It’s a great time to develop skills and enjoy the process.

5. Do your research

Look around and try different avenues for those special items, just remember to order well in advance if you are looking offshore for special items not found here.

New Zealand is a treasure trove of small businesses who have so much to offer you to help you give the best gift at Christmas and all those other special occasions. Ask around, use facebook handmade groups, search google, use those listening and detective skills you acquired earlier on in this blog.

I believe in you and know that you can become the best gift giver ever, enjoy the process and have a very happy holiday season!

2021-11-10T08:55:03+13:0022 November 2020|Advice, Xmas|0 Comments
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